Dangeau’s Diary, January 1686

Philippe de Courcillon, Marquis de Dangeau

January 2d. — There was a kind of sedition at Saint Germain. The inhabitants having risen to demand that their curate should not be dismissed. Seditious expressions were uttered, several persons were imprisoned by order of the King, many priests have been interdicted and the curate is exiled to Rouen.

5th. — The King and Monseigneur went to dine at Marly, accompanied by the Princesse de Conti, Mesdames de Montespan, de Maintenon, and de Thianges. The Princesse de Conti returned about four o’clock. Monsieur and Madame arrived there at five, with a great number of ladies and courtiers. The palace was well lighted up and in the saloon was a very agreeable representation of the four seasons of the year. Monseigneur and Madame de Montespan represented autumn. The Duc de Maine and Madame de Maintenon winter. The Duc de Bourbon and Madame de Thianges summer. Spring was personated by the Duchesse de Bourbon and Madame de Chevreuse. There was a profusion of rich stuffs, plate, and all that is peculiar to each season; and the ladies and gentlemen attached to the court played and carried off their winnings. It is supposed that there were at least 15000 pistoles worth of dresses. Play was continued till supper, and, on its conclusion, the King and Monseigneur distributed what still remained in the shops. The Dauphine was not at the fete, because she is supposedly pregnant. The King sent her some beautiful jewels, in gold and diamonds. Madame de l’lllebonne and Mademoiselle d’Arpajon were the most fortunate and gained the most valuable prizes. The winners carried off their gains and the losers paid nothing.

8th. — The King has given a pension of 2000 francs to the Marquis de Belsence, a new convert, and one of similar amount to Madame de La Rambouillet, who has also been converted.

11th. — I have learnt that a decree has been issued against those of the pretended reformed religion, by which it is ordered that all children under the age of sixteen shall be brought up in our religion; for which purpose they are to be removed from their Huguenot parents and are to be placed with such relations as may be Catholics.

24th. — News has arrived that the Marquis de Bordage has been arrested near Trelon, between Sambre and Meuse. He was desirous of quitting the Kingdom with his family. His wife was wounded by a musket-shot. He was arrested by the peasants, who formed a guard to prevent Protestants from leaving the Kingdom. Le Bordage was conveyed to the citadel of Lille, his wife to that of Cambray, and Mademoiselle de la Moussaye, his sister-in-law, to that of Tournay. His children have been sent back to Paris, where they will be brought up in our religion.

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