Dangeau’s Diary, May 1687

Philippe de Courcillon, Marquis de Dangeau

5th. — The prince d’Isenghien is at the point of death, and has begged the Marshal d’Humieres to forgive his marriage with M. de Surville. The Marshal has received his daughter, whom Monsieur d’Isenghien had caused to come to the little stable where he lies ill.

8th. — Versailles. We are informed that the King has sent counsellors of state into the provinces, with commissioners, for the purpose of in quiring into the abuses committed in raising the King’s taxes, especially with regard to the excise and the gabelles, and also of receiving the complaints of such corporate bodies and individuals as may have been aggrieved by the agents of the farmers-general. Upon their return, the King will order the reparation of private wrongs, and will also make some general regulations upon the subject.

14th. — Vertus. The King came to dine at Fromentiere, and passed the night at Vertus. He there learnt of the death of Mademoiselle de Simiane, maid of honour to Madame, and could not help saying, upon being certain of her death, that she was the ugliest maid he had ever seen.

27th. — Madame de Maintenon has exercised her benevolence towards many of the poor noblesse. Upon his arrival at Verdun, the King saw a great inundation, the sluices being opened in order that he might see it with more effect. His Majesty changed an ancient custom observed by the canon at Verdun, that of standing during the elevation of the host and of being covered at processions.

Leave a Reply