La Maison Royale de Saint-Louis

The Maison Royale de Saint-Louis aka Saint-Cyr was created in 1684 by Louis XIV at request of his secret wife Madame de Maintenon and served as school for impoverished noble girls.   The creation ofContinue reading

Dangeau’s Diary, May 1687

5th. — The prince d’Isenghien is at the point of death, and has begged the Marshal d’Humieres to forgive his marriage with M. de Surville. The Marshal has received his daughter, whom Monsieur d’Isenghien hadContinue reading

Le Grand Trianon

After the tiles of the Trianon de porcelaine deteriorated more and more, Louis XIV ordered the small palais to be demolished and replaced with a larger structure of more lasting material. Marble.   The planning was entrustedContinue reading

Mouches

Mouches aka fake beauty spots were incredibly popular at the court of Louis XIV and worn by males and females alike.   They were usually made of black silk, velvet, muslin or taffeta, but could alsoContinue reading

Le potager du roi

One of the most important places of Versailles was the potager du roi -the King’s kitchen Garden- for it ensured the Sun King always had enough of his favourite vegetables and fruits on his plate. He didContinue reading

Henriette d’Angleterre

Henrietta of England was born on 16 June in 1644 at Bedford House in Exeter at the height of the English Civil War. Her mother Henriette-Marie de France, daughter of le bon roi Henri, whoContinue reading

Chaise à Porteurs

Chaise à Porteurs aka sedan chairs were an incredibly useful mode of transportation at the court of Louis XIV and especially at Versailles, where the distances between buildings were, and still are, rather huge. TheyContinue reading

Le Trianon de Porcelaine

In the 1670’s, as the palace of Versailles was still in the making, its park bordered on a little village called Trianon.   Trianon, or Triarnum as it was called in a papal bull ofContinue reading

Dangeau’s Diary, March 1687

9th. — Monsieur de Roquelaure had asked the King for the alienation fines of some estates be longing to Monsieur de Lauzun, and the King refused them, saying, that no person should wish to profitContinue reading

Palais des Tuileries

When you stand at the large place in front of the Louvre and turn your gaze away from the palace and towards the street, you will see a beautiful garden in the distance. This gardenContinue reading

Révolte des Lustucru

Louis XIV had to face his first revolt after the Fronde in 1662, one year after he took the reins of government into his own hands. The county of Boulonnais was of a strategic importanceContinue reading

Dangeau’s Diary, February 1687

  13th. — Versailles. The Duc de Crequi died this evening at Paris at three o’clock. The Duc de Gesvres, gentleman of the chamber for this year, upon opening the King’s curtains, informed him ofContinue reading

Lettre de cachet

Lettres de cachet were one of the most powerful tools of Louis XIV, for they could command, create… silence people or make people vanish forever. The power to issue lettres de cachet is a royal privilegeContinue reading

Le Palais-Royal

The Palais-Royal in Paris, situated pretty much across the street from the Louvre, was home to many members of the royal family, including Louis XIV during the turbulent times of the Fronde. It was there,Continue reading

Dangeau’s Diary, January 1687

  January 5th. — Versailles. The Dauphine was taken ill in the night. The King called upon her before he went to mass and his Majesty has deferred the children’s baptism till her health isContinue reading

Adieu 2017…

What a year, hm? I’m surely not the only one who thinks that the world got a little bit more crazy in 2017, am I? But I shan’t rant about politics and such things… forContinue reading

The Robe de Cour

Fashion was something very important at Louis XIV’s court. While the fashion for the gentleman of quality did not change too much over the years, those of the ladies of quality changed quite often.  Continue reading

Dangeau’s Diary, December 1686

10th. — The King has been very well today. He suffers very little and is very tranquil, but the intelligence he received this evening of the danger of Monsieur le Prince (le Grand Condé), hasContinue reading

La Révolte de Roure

Vivarais, spring 1670. After a hard winter had destroyed all the olive trees of Languedoc, from Montpellier to Aubenas, rumours of new taxes sparked a revolt.   The chronicler Dourille put it like this: “every dayContinue reading